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BC Project members meet Premier Wen Jiabao

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Last Updated on Monday, 13 April 2009 19:06 Sunday, 01 March 2009 11:17

BC Project members meet Premier Wen Jiabao in London China Town.

BC Project members meet Premier Wan
 

Chinese Lib Dems and Ethnic Minority Lib Dems jointly hosted a Chinese New Year banquet

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Saturday, 28 February 2009 10:04

Chinese Lib Dems and EMLD (Ethnic Minority Lib Dems) jointly hosted a Chinese New Year banquet at the 'Top of the Town Restaurant' in London Chinatown on 12 Feb 2009.

100 dinner guests, which included prominent members of the House of Lords, MPs, and a representative from the Chinese Embassy, were treated to a 12 course meal with wine, as well as a lively debate by Liberal Youth members (Edwin Loo, Dave Ravel, Sara Scarlett and Naomi Smith) on the motion: "The Year of the Ox will be a Year of Stability". Those arguing against the motion won the vote of the audience, afterall Lib Dems would much prefer instability and the toppling of the old Labour vs Tory structure!  (Incidentally President Obama was born in the year of the Ox.)  The evening was much enjoyed by all.

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Chinese Community gets voting in the Chinese New Year

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Last Updated on Monday, 02 March 2009 09:10 Sunday, 01 February 2009 00:00

Kicking-off the Chinese New Year, the Chinese community speak up as a major voice to contend with for upcoming elections. Amongst the celebrations in London Chinatown, many Chinese people got lessons on how to register to vote, with party representatives from Labour, Conservative, Liberal Democrats and the Green Party schooling the community on the issues.

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FT.com : Anglo-Chinese urged to talk politics

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 12 November 2008 20:46 Written by markwu Wednesday, 12 November 2008 20:39

The Financial Times ran an article in February 2007 about Christine Lee and The BC Project: 
 
When the Chinese Year of the Pig is rung in tomorrow, one of Britain's largest yet least visible communities will have a rare moment in the limelight. 
 
This year - 4704 on the Chinese lunar calendar - is the time finally to raise the political profile of Britain's Chinese people, according to Christine Lee, lawyer and community activist. "The Chinese must stop being the silent community," she says from the London offices of her Birmingham-based firm, the largest Chinese law firm in the country. 
 
"We've been here for three generations and are the UK's third-largest immigrant group, but we have no representation in parliament, and no established voice. We need to take action and stand up for ourselves.
 
Since the death last year of Lord Chan, Ms Lee has been the Anglo-Chinese community's most prominent representative, doggedly lobbying parliament and att-empting to engage second-generation Chinese through her Integration of British Chinese into Politics project. 
 
The community she is trying to rally is one of the fastest-growing in the UK. More than 560,000 people of Chinese descent lived in Britain by 2003, an almost 12 per cent increase from 2001, the Office for National Statistics estimated in its latest population projection from the 2001 census. 
 
 

British Chinese Online Identities: Politics, Participation and the Internet

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Sunday, 05 October 2008 04:00

David Parker of the University of Nottingham and Miri Song of the University of Kent recently published a research report on "British Chinese Online Identities: Politics, Participation and the Internet".
 
Some of the executive members of The BC Project were interviewed for this report. A summary can be found below and the full report can also be downloaded as a pdf file via the following link:
 
 
 
Introduction

Britain's long-established Chinese population is often held to be among the most successful ethnic minority communities. Yet apart from the presenter of How to Look Good Naked and the occasional reality television contestant the high economic and educational achievement of the British Chinese has yet to be reflected in the nation's public life. There are no Chinese Members of Parliament, only a handful of local councillors, and few decision-makers in high places.

Read more: British Chinese Online Identities: Politics, Participation and the Internet

   

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